Webster’s Forgotten Words

So recently, I came across a Huffington Post article by Paul Anthony Jones
(which can be found here) that talked about some of Webster’s best forgotten words.

The list, which I will copy and paste, includes some words I will be scribbling into my word of the day calender…

AFTER-WISE (adj.)
Defined by Webster as “wise afterwards or too late”
BABBLEMENT (n.)
“Senseless prattle” or “unmeaning words,” according to Webster.
CYCOPEDE
Cycopede is all but unique to Webster, who defined it as both a variation of cyclopedia (as in encyclopedia), and as a term for the entire “circle of human knowledge.”
DAGGLE-TAIL (adj.)
As a verb, to daggle is “to befoul” or “dirty”, or more specifically, “to trail in mud or wet grass”.
EAR-ERECTING (adj.)
Another of Webster’s clever compound adjectives, this time describing any sound that “sets up the ears”.
FOPDOODLE (n.)
The perfect name for “an insignificant fellow” — Webster described this word as “vulgar and not used.”
GASTRILOQUIST (n.)
An old-fashioned word for a ventriloquist, or as Webster explains, “one who so modified his voice that it seems to come from another person or place.”
HUGGER-MUGGER (n.)
“low cant word” synonymous with privacy or clandestineness — doing something in hugger-mugger […] meant doing it in absolute secrecy.
ILLAQUEATION (n.)
A formal word for “the act of ensnaring; a catching or entrapping.”
JACKPUDDING (n.)
A jackpudding is a “merry-andrew” or “a zany” according to Webster
KISSING-CRUST (n.)
As loaves of bread expand in the oven as they’re cooked, a kissing-crust forms when they spread so far that they touch.
LONGINQUITY (n.)
Derived from the Latin word for distance, longinquity is a formal word for remoteness or isolation, or for any vast distance in space or time.
MAFFLE (v.)
To stammer or stumble on your words.
NUNCUPATORY (adj.)
If something is nuncupatory then it exists in name only. The word can also be used to describe a verbal rather than written agreement.
OBAMBULATE (v.)
Literally means “to walk about.”
PACKTHREAD (n.)
The strong string or twine used to wrap parcels? That’s packthread.
QUADRIN (n.)
A quadrin was old copper coin, which Webster explains was “in value [worth] about a farthing”.
RAKESHAME (n.)
“A vile, dissolute wretch”
SHEEP-BITE (v.)
To sheep-bite is “to practice petty thefts” according to Webster.
TARDIGRADOUS (adj.)
“Slow-paced; moving or stepping slowly.”
UPTRAIN (v.)
To uptrain is “to educate” — literally “to train up.”
VERNATE (v.)
Derived from the Latin word for the spring, to vernate is “to become young again.”
WRANGLESOME (adj.)
To wrangle is “to dispute angrily” or “to involve in contention,” according to Webster.
XEROPHAGY (n.)
Xerophagy is “the eating of dry meats,” according to Webster
YOKE-MATE (n.)
Also called a yoke-fellow, a yoke-mate is “an associate or companion.”
ZUFFOLO (n.)
“a little flute… especially that which is used to teach birds.”

 

Seriously? Tardigradous. I am going to try to use this in three sentences.

1) Why are you so tardigradous when it comes to seeing my huge 100,000 sq/ft showroom full of new and used restaurant equipment?
2) We aren’t tardigradous when it comes to giving you a great deal with FREE curbside delivery!
3) Yo yoke-mate, stop being tardigradous. Get your butt down to the Frog and see all these hot deals! Don’t be after-wise!