Food Truck Start Up: Walk Yourself Through the Customer Experience

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As a food truck owner, you only spend a few minutes with each customer. Unlike a brick and mortar location where you would have a more intimate relationship with your customers and the ability to approach them and ask how their experience was, at food trucks you only see them when they’re ordering and walking off with their food. So how can you even begin to grasp what the customer’s see and feel when they walk up to your truck? The best solution is to take some time to perform walk-throughs of the area outside your truck from the customers’ perspective.

Here, courtesy of One Fat Frog Restaurant Equipment, is a look at some of the important steps you should go through to give yourself the customer experience:

Pretend you’re seeing your truck for the first time: this may be tough to do since you spend so much time with your food truck, but step back and take a good look at what the customers see. Examine your truck’s appearance and ask yourself if it matches the concept. Pretend you’re a customer who has to wait in a line outside of your truck. What are the interesting focal points they’ll be staring at? Is it easy for them to line up and for the line to flow? If you’re serving food at night, is there appropriate lighting and do the customers feel safe? And, perhaps most importantly, is your food truck clean?

Look at all of the details around your truck. Make any necessary changes to make sure your truck is memorable and showcases your concept and business personality.

Walk through a typical customer transaction: a smart approach to this is to have a friend that your staff doesn’t know perform a walk-through for you. Have a friend play the role of customer and then give you feedback on their experience. Have them look for specific aspects, such as if anyone greeted them, if the staff appeared friendly and helpful, and what happens when they make it to the front of the line. Even if they’re not the first in line, waiting customers should be greeted.

Take care of the areas you can improve: write out a list of what needs to be improved and suggest ways they can be handled. Present the list to your staff and have them come up with their own ideas for improvement. Together you and your staff should come up with the best solutions.

One Fat Frog Restaurant Equipment

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